The size of consonant and vowel sentences, which make up the segment of the language population, was discussed in Chapters 1 and 2. In addition to the number of segments using languages, it is also important to consider the possibilities of combining segments to create longer structures like words and syllables. Some languages allow a very free combination of segments, while in others the combinations are very limited. In this chapter, the complexity of sequencing segments inside syllables is discussed to study an important aspect of how the combination of individual sounds is controlled beyond the entire language. Remember that underlined syllables have stronger, clearer vowels and reduced non-concrete vowels. The trick is to change the quality of the vowels according to the part of the language. In „contract” (n.), the underlined syllable must be a clear /ah/, but in „contract” (v.), the first syllable is reduced in the stress; the vowel becomes a schwa. Canonical syllable patterns are most often presented as a series of symbols C and V, C representing a consonance and V a vocal sound (including complex vocal elements such as diphthongs, which may be present in the language). The only type of syllable present in each language is CV, that is, a syllable composed of a single consonant before a vowel. In a relatively small number of languages, this is the only type of syllable allowed. These languages are Hawaiian and MBA (Adamawa-Ubangian, Niger-Congo); Democratic Republic of the Congo).

Languages in which it is permissible not to have an initial consonance are more often found, such as Fiji, Igbo (Niger-Congo); Nigeria) and Yareba (Yareban); Papua New Guinea). For these languages, the canonical syllable can be represented as (C)V, with parentheses specifying that an initial consonant is an optional element. If a language only allows syllables that fit this pattern, the language will have a simple syllabistic structure. The classification of languages into three categories of syllable complexes, simple, moderate and complex, of course neglects many other questions of segment distribution (for example. B if the syllables at the beginning and ends of words have the same or other boundaries as those that are internal to words) and should embellish some important differences in the rarity or frequency of more complex syllable types in a given language. Some common sense flexibility was used to decide how to classify a given language. For example, if certain types of consonant sequences have recently been introduced into a language because international words (such as sports or golf) have been borrowed, the language is classified according to what happens in more established vocabularies. Despite its summary nature, the three-way classification offers a useful grouping with interesting geographical features. The syllable is a recognized unit in linguistic analysis that explains quite well the number of rhythmic units perceived in a word or longer expression.. . . .

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